Where’s God?

So my husband said something from the pulpit that bothered me. Don’t get me wrong…. his sermons are great (okay, I’m a little biased).

He was talking about where we find God and how, with the advent of Facebook, we’re able to share our precious God-given moments with the world.

Our sweet granddaughter in Portland, Oregon, just started walking. He said. She’s adorable! Her parents post pictures all the time, and when I look at her, I think I see the face of God.

Of course he does. So do I. Just look at her….who couldn’t see God in those blue eyes and that big, toothy smile?

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But last week on Facebook, I saw another child’s face.  I didn’t want to see it. (That’s the trouble with Facebook…you end up seeing things you never wanted to).

It wasn’t my sweet smiling granddaughter. It was the boy everyone’s talking about, the boy everyone’s writing blog posts about, the Syrian boy covered in dust and blood, sitting motionless with haunting eyes. The boy who didn’t look like a boy at all.

When I first saw that image as I scrolled through my news feed, I just quickly zoomed right along. What on earth was that? I thought, in shock. Was that a doll? That couldn’t possibly have been real. I pushed it to the back of my mind. I didn’t want my thoughts filled with horror like that, I didn’t want my mind seeing those images. I didn’t want my nice, joy-filled day interrupted like that. So I didn’t even read the headline.

His name is Omran. The image of him, bloodied and covered with dust, sitting silently in an ambulance awaiting help, is another stark reminder of the toll of the war in Syria.

Whatever that was, it must be someone’s idea of a sick joke. I thought, and continued scrolling until I came to my smiling granddaughter again.

But it wasn’t a joke was it? It was real. This little boy is real! His name is Omran Daqneesh. He was pulled out from under the rubble of his home in Syria. He is five years old, the same age as my eldest grandson, the one who just moved to a beautiful new neighborhood surrounded by trees where he rides his bike with his brother.

Omran’s brother died yesterday from his injuries.

And even though I’m a strong believer I just can’t help asking….. where’s God in all of that?

Why do some children die and some children live?

Why is it that my grandchildren can ride their bikes in safety while other children are blown to bits in Syria?

It’s so easy for me to see God in the happy, smiling face of my granddaughter, but where’s God in the haunted face of Omran?

If I believe that God is in every child, (which I do), then God can’t just be in the face of the happy – God has to be in the face of the hopeless, and the haunted, and the hurt. God IS there… in the face of little Omran.

God is there, crying in silent agony for what was meant to be a beautiful world where babies die and children are bombed.

I don’t know the answers to all my questions. But I do know that I can help.

I don’t understand God. But I understand my responsibility.

I cannot turn away. I am called, ALL believers are called, to be part of the healing in whatever way they can.

Only healing can take away the hurt.

*****

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6 thoughts on “Where’s God?

  1. Dorothy Smith

    Glenys, I understand where you are coming from. I have 2 of the most delightful, cute little Great Grand Children with another little girl on the way and when I think of the children who are so abused I am so
    grateful for the wonderful parents ‘my ‘ precious babies have but I wonder the why’s too. WHY – years ago
    one of my teen friends told us ask God When,What, When,Where, but NEVER why – but it is hard not to ask why. I understand that God has give choice to us humans and choice has been so abused but it is so hard not to ask why. Why doesn’t God intervene – an all powerful, all loving God – why or why not? Any answers? I, like you, don’t understand that part of God.

    Reply
    1. Glenys Post author

      No Dorothy.. I don’t have answers. It’s all such a mystery. But sometimes, when I think to myself ‘I can’t wait to get to heaven and ask God all those questions’, then I hear a little voice telling me, ‘maybe those questions that trouble me so much on earth won’t be important any more.’ But this side of heaven, they sure are! I love the thought of asking God When, What, Where, but never Why. I’ll have to practice that!

      Reply
  2. Kara Rowe

    I personally believe God wants us to ask why. I am not sure we will ever get the answers, but if we are to he in a true, honest open relationship with a loving God we need to ask the tough questions. Then wait ask God reveals God’s self to us. The Psalmists cried out to God, why should we be any different?

    Reply
  3. Natalie Nellist

    This is such a heavy read, heavy on my heart and heavy because my little one is smiling on your blog entry followed by a not so great photo – the juxtaposition is haunting, yet we are reminded of the evils in the world. xo

    WHY? Such a heavy question we all want to know?

    Reply

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